Combining Hoʻoponopono and Reiki

This definition taken from Wiki is a pretty straight forward interpretation of what Ho ‘oponopono is.

Hoʻoponopono (ho-o-pono-pono)
is an ancient Hawaiian practice of reconciliation and forgiveness.
Similar forgiveness practices were performed on islands throughout the
South Pacific, including Samoa, Tahiti and New Zealand. Traditionally
hoʻoponopono is practiced by healing priests or kahuna lapaʻau among
family members of a person who is physically ill. Modern versions are
performed within the family by a family elder, or by the individual
alone.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ho%CA%BBoponopono

I
don’t want to give you my own definition but what I want to do instead
is tell you why I recommend it to many and the effectiveness of it.

Many
times when working with a client related to the law of attraction I
recommend its use. It is very affective at clearing away the blocks that
are in the way of a person manifesting their desires. It is also
affective when it comes to healing relationship between you and others
or situation.

One of the greatest causes of disease is not
forgiving. Not forgiving yourself and others. Guilt can manifest in so
many negative ways. Many times when Jesus healed a person that is what
he did. He released them of the guilt they were holding or cleared away
resentment they were holding onto. He used the power of the spoken word
by saying “Thou sins are forgiven thee!” (Matthew 9:5, Luke 5:23, Luke
7:48) That is not the only way to release the guilt and resentment.
Actually other things could be said and it would still work as it did
for Jesus so many times. That is the power of reconciliation and
forgiveness and that is what practicing Ho ‘oponopono can do. Anything,
situation, problem, issue…Ho ‘oponopono can be use and you will
experience successful results IF you believe that it works and you
stick with using it and don’t just repeat it three times and call it a
failure. With anything, there is the need to put a little time and
effort in to receive good results.

HO’OPONOPONO
by Joe Vitale

“Two
years ago, I heard about a therapist in Hawaii who cured a complete
ward of criminally insane patients” without ever seeing any of them. The
psychologist would study an inmate’s chart and then look within himself
to see how he created that person’s illness. As he improved himself,
the patient improved.

When I first heard this story, I thought it
was an urban legend. How could anyone heal anyone else by healing
himself? How could even the best self-improvement master cure the
criminally insane” It didn’t make any sense. It wasn’t logical, so I
dismissed the story.

However, I heard it again a year later. I
heard that the therapist had used a Hawaiian healing process called ho
‘oponopono. I had never heard of it, yet I couldn’t let it leave my
mind. If the story was at all true, I had to know more. I had always
understood “total responsibility” to mean that I am responsible for what
I think and do. Beyond that, it’s out of my hands. I think that most
people think of total responsibility that way. We’re responsible for
what we do, not what anyone else does – but that’s wrong.

The
Hawaiian therapist who healed those mentally ill people would teach me
an advanced new perspective about total responsibility. His name is Dr.
Ihaleakala Hew Len. We probably spent an hour talking on our first phone
call. I asked him to tell me the complete story of his work as a
therapist.

He explained that he worked at Hawaii State Hospital for four years.

That ward where they kept the criminally insane was dangerous.

Psychologists
quit on a monthly basis. The staff called in sick a lot or simply quit.
People would walk through that ward with their backs against the wall,
afraid of being attacked by patients. It was not a pleasant place to
live, work, or visit.

Dr. Len told me that he never saw patients.
He agreed to have an office and to review their files.While he looked
at those files, he would work on himself. As he worked on himself,
patients began to heal.

After a few months, patients that had to
be shackled were being allowed to walk freely, he told me. Others who
had to be heavily medicated were getting off their medications. And
those who had no chance of ever being released were being freed. I was
in awe.”Not only that,” he went on, “but the staff began to enjoy coming
to work. Absenteeism and turnover disappeared. We ended up with more
staff than we needed because patients were being released, and all the
staff was showing up to work. Today, that ward is closed.”

This
is where I had to ask the million dollar question: “What were you doing
within yourself that caused those people to change?”

“I was
simply healing the part of me that created them,” he said. I didn’t
understand. Dr. Len explained that total responsibility for your life
means that everything in your life- simply because it is in your life –
is your responsibility. In a literal sense the entire world is your
creation.

Whew. This is tough to swallow. Being responsible for
what I say or do is one thing. Being responsible for what everyone in my
life says or does is quite another. Yet, the truth is this: if you take
complete responsibility for your life, then everything you see, hear,
taste, touch, or in any way experience is your responsibility because it
is in your life. This means that terrorist activity, the president, the
economy or anything you experience and don’t like – is up for you to
heal. They don’t exist, in a manner of speaking, except as projections
from inside you. The problem isn’t with them, it’s with you, and to
change them, you have to change you.

I know this is tough to
grasp, let alone accept or actually live. Blame is far easier than total
responsibility, but as I spoke with Dr. Len, I began to realize that
healing for him and in ho ‘oponopono means loving yourself.

If
you want to improve your life, you have to heal your life. If you want
to cure anyone, even a mentally ill criminal you do it by healing you.

I
asked Dr. Len how he went about healing himself. What was he doing,
exactly, when he looked at those patients’ files? “I just kept saying,
“I’m sorry” and “I love you” over and over again,”
he explained.

“That’s it”

“That’s it. “

Turns out that loving yourself is the greatest way to improve yourself, and as you improve yourself, you improve your world.

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